Fungal Tree Infections
Fungal Tree Infections
London Tree Reports, Surveys, Inspections - Fungal Tree Infestations

Sudden Oak Death

Sudden Oak Death, SOD, is the common name of a disease caused by the fungal-like plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum.

As well as attacking many species of oak tree, it has been found on Beech, Sweet chestnut, Horse Chestnut, Douglas Fir, European Larch, Sitka Spruce and Japanese Larch trees.

Sudden Oak Death

Lawson Cypress Trees

Phytophthora lateralis is a fungal pathogen that attacks and kills tree roots.

Lawson Cyress Trees are particularly susceptible to this fungus but is known to attack other species. There is no known cure and treatment involves limiting the spread using bio security measures.

Lawson Cypress Trees

Ash Dieback

Ash Dieback is caused by a fungal pathogen known as Chalara fraxinea.

The disease causes leaf loss and crown dieback and normally causes tree death. Different types of Ash trees come into leaf at different times. However, all healthy trees should all be in leaf by mid-June.

More on Ash Dieback

Massaria Disease of London Plane

Massaria is a fungus which infects plane tree branches. It normally infects branches which are less than 10cm in diameter but has been found in branches up to 20cm.

An infected branch may be still be in leaf and alive but can be substantially weakened by the disease, leading to possible breakage.

London Plane Massaria Disease

Dutch Elm Disease

Dutch Elm Disease or DED for short, is a catastrophic disease of native UK elm trees.

It is caused by a fungal pathogen known as Ophiostoma novo-ulmi. It is a disease which attacks vascular canals within a tree, preventing transport of water and nutrients to the canopy of the tree

Dutch Elm Disease

Red Band Needle Blight

It infects many conifer species around the world but Pine is the most common host. In the UK, it mainly effects Corsican, Lodgepole and Scots Pine.

Fungicidal treatment in large populations of forestry trees is not recommended due to environment and cost considerations.

Red Band Needle Blight

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