Subsidence Tree Reports
Subsidence Tree Reports
Investigation and Inspection Reports for Tree Root Subsidence
Mini Pile Driver

Investigation and Inspection Reports for Tree Root Subsidence

Subsidence claims are costing UK insurance companies more than £500,0000 per annum. Tree roots can be a source of subsidence damage.

We work for some of the biggest Loss Adjusters and Insurance Companies in the UK, producing subsidence reports and tree surveys for customers
throughout London and Beyond.

UK Tree Subsidence Report by the Forest Commission

Tree SubsidenceOur reports provide the following advice and information:

  • Soil type analysis
  • DNA root identification (if required)
  • Root barrier recommendations
  • Crown reductions and pollarding advice
  • Root pruning recommendation
  • BS5837:2012 Tree Report
  • Safe planting distances for new trees
  • Climate change advice

Subsidence is normally a problem on shrinkable clay soils. Low rise, pre-1950s properties are at the highest risk, due to having foundations only half a metre deep. This includes most Edwardian and Victorian houses in the UK.

Tree roots can cause desiccation of the ground near to a building causing the clay soil to shrink leading to subsidence. However, there are many factors which can lead to subsidence and you will need a thorough investigation and inspection by a qualified experienced arboriculturist to establish the extent of the problem.

Removing problem trees adjacent to a property is not always a good thing. This can cause the ground to swell, leading to building damage due to Heave - the opposite of subsidence.

How We Can Help

We will produce a Tree Subsidence Report which will assess the probability that the trees are the cause of the problem. The report will also give recommendations on the work necessary to to cure the problem. We also make recommendations on scheduled work to to minimise or eliminate future subsidence problems

Our detailed subsidence report will include root identification of suspected trees, the distance from the building, age and dimensions. Our report will contain details of the soil type, plasticity index and underlying geology. The report will also take into consideration any changes that have been made to the building, such as extensions, new garages, new driveways and patios - all of which can effect the moisture content in the underlying clay soil.

If you have a suspect tree root related property subsidence, get in touch for some friendly help and advice.

Contact us

Tree Root Barriers

Root barriers are a potential alternative option to tree removals and engineered solutions in subsidence damage claims.

They usually offer considerable cost advantages relative to underpinning and offer significant amenity and environmental benefits where trees are retained as a result of their installation.

However, Root Barriers are not always viable in urban and suburban situations. Consideration needs to be given to the future health and stability of retained trees requiring expert arboricultural advice.

Below ground services may but do not always prevent a root barrier being installed.

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Safe Planting Distances (Metres)


Property Distance
Root Spread
Cypress
Birch
Apple
Pear
Cherry, Plum & Peach
Hawthorn
Rowan/ Mountain Ash
Plane
Lime
Beech
Ash
Horse Chestnut
Elm
Maple & Sycamore
Oak
Willow
Poplar
3.5
4.0
5.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
7.0
7.5
8.0
9.0
10.0
10.0
12.0
12.0
18.0
18.0
20.0
20.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
11.0
11.5
11.0
15.0
20.0
15.0
21.0
23.0
25.0
20.0
30.0
40.0
30.0

Heave

Ground heave is the opposite of subsidence.

Heave occurs when the predominately clay soil up around the foundations of a building swell up due to moisture retention.

A typical cause of heave is when trees adjacent to a property are removed but it also occurs when drains are broken.

Buildings are particularly at risk when trees that are older than the building are removed. this limits the nature of management work that can be done on the tree.

Finding a solution to heave induced root damage is not straight forward making it a very important requirement in mitigating subsidence claims.

Tree Induced Heave

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